Ethos India HR Consulting In India Staffing Agencies In India Recruitment Agencies In Ahmedabad

An effective goal setting will help you to set, measure and hot your career goal in the quickest possible way. #TipOfTheDay #EthosIndia #Ahmedabad #EthosHR #Recruitment #CareerGuide #India#recruitment #jobs #jobsearch #hiring #job #career #employment #hr #recruiting #work #business #recruiter #humanresources #vacancy #recruitmentagency

An effective goal setting will help you to set, measure and hot your career goal in the quickest possible way. #TipOfTheDay #EthosIndia #Ahmedabad #EthosHR #Recruitment #CareerGuide #India#recruitment #jobs #jobsearch #hiring #job #career #employment #hr #recruiting #work #business #recruiter #humanresources #vacancy #recruitmentagency

An effective goal setting will help you to set, measure and hot your career goal in the quickest possible way. #TipOfTheDay #EthosIndia #Ahmedabad #EthosHR #Recruitment #CareerGuide #India#recruitment #jobs #jobsearch #hiring #job #career #employment #hr #recruiting #work #business #recruiter #humanresources #vacancy #recruitmentagency

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Our in-house research and recruiting capabilities are extensive. We follow the best systems & processes in the recruitment industry, and so have the ability to serve our clients the relevant & quality profiles with a minimum lead-time. #EthosIndia #Ahmedabad #EthosHR #Recruitment #CareerGuide #India

Our in-house research and recruiting capabilities are extensive. We follow the best systems & processes in the recruitment industry, and so have the ability to serve our clients the relevant & quality profiles with a minimum lead-time. #EthosIndia #Ahmedabad #EthosHR #Recruitment #CareerGuide #India

Our in-house research and recruiting capabilities are extensive. We follow the best systems & processes in the recruitment industry, and so have the ability to serve our clients the relevant & quality profiles with a minimum lead-time. #EthosIndia #Ahmedabad #EthosHR #Recruitment #CareerGuide #India

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RPO solutions that create long-term competitive advantage. Innovative recruiting and sourcing approach. #RPOSolutions #EthosIndia #Ahmedabad #EthosHR #Recruitment #Jobs

RPO solutions that create long-term competitive advantage. Innovative recruiting and sourcing approach. #RPOSolutions #EthosIndia #Ahmedabad #EthosHR #Recruitment #Jobs

RPO solutions that create long-term competitive advantage. Innovative recruiting and sourcing approach. #RPOSolutions #EthosIndia #Ahmedabad #EthosHR #Recruitment #Jobs

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The Future of HR Jac Fitz-enz | Talent Management Imagine you are the incoming CEO of a struggling company. The board of directors has hired you to turn the company around as soon as possible. What are you going to do? Obviously, you have to start with big questions regarding strategy, structure, product development, sales, cash management and culture. You will probably shuffle the top management team and provide a clear vision of what and how the enterprise has to change. You need to improve cash flow pronto. You might get control of IT's massive investment by moving toward cloud computing. Eventually, you reach the human resources function. You are smart enough to know the issue is not the 1.5 percent of operating expense that goes into running HR. For the company to be successful, turnover must slow and productivity must grow. You're not an HR professional, so you aren't burdened by traditional thinking or a warm spot in your heart for those nice people who labor there. You start with an objective view of human capital management just as you did with management of cash, products, sales and information. It's probably a good idea to find out what kind of data you have on workforce productivity. Has there been any analysis at either the strategic or tactical level in the past? You could form a small analytics function to help study questions of capability, performance and past human capital investments. Nothing beats having accurate and relevant objective data on which to base the tough decisions ahead. So, what is the best way to ensure a sustainable, highly productive and engaged workforce? A large part of the question is where should the various HR functions reside? Form should follow function. Should they all be in a central unit or spread throughout the company where they can be agile and responsive, not to mention accountable for value generation? You decide that, as CEO, you are ultimately responsible for the workforce, so you make strategic workforce planning, including succession planning, your responsibility. You give a senior HR executive that job and have him or her report directly to you. A recruiting strategy is next, and where should that reside? How about putting it under the COO - the person responsible for company operations? Next comes compensation and benefits. Should that go to the CFO, who is accountable for cash management, or do you put that in operations as well? Maybe you carve out health and welfare benefits to finance and leave pay and incentive compensation with the COO. Now, how are the people best developed? Should development be part of your central workforce function? Pieces such as leadership and engagement likely should go together, but where to put them? You have short-term problems such as engagement and long-term questions of succession. It's complicated. You can't just toss them all together like in the past. That didn't work. Who is going to keep employee records and deal with governance requirements? This is sensitive stuff and getting more so every day. What about general employee relations problems? Should they be pushed back to line management where they started 150 years ago? Isn't that what fostered the birth and growth of labor unions? Maybe you should leave the old structure in place and just give it new marching orders. But if you take a car that isn't running well and repaint it, does that make it run better? If HR was not a value-adding function when you arrived, can you afford to leave it as is while you redesign the enterprise? Just how important is workforce management in your new scheme? I'm sure you will figure it out, but one thing is certain. You have to change the fundamental concept that has driven human resources and human capital management in the past. It did not serve the company well during periods of rapid change and may have been a major reason the enterprise was foundering. After all, nothing happens unless a human being acts - all other assets of the enterprise just lay there waiting to be leveraged. It seems as though you have to give HR new consideration, because it is so important.

The Future of HR Jac Fitz-enz | Talent Management Imagine you are the incoming CEO of a struggling company. The board of directors has hired you to turn the company around as soon as possible. What are you going to do? Obviously, you have to start with big questions regarding strategy, structure, product development, sales, cash management and culture. You will probably shuffle the top management team and provide a clear vision of what and how the enterprise has to change. You need to improve cash flow pronto. You might get control of IT's massive investment by moving toward cloud computing. Eventually, you reach the human resources function. You are smart enough to know the issue is not the 1.5 percent of operating expense that goes into running HR. For the company to be successful, turnover must slow and productivity must grow. You're not an HR professional, so you aren't burdened by traditional thinking or a warm spot in your heart for those nice people who labor there. You start with an objective view of human capital management just as you did with management of cash, products, sales and information. It's probably a good idea to find out what kind of data you have on workforce productivity. Has there been any analysis at either the strategic or tactical level in the past? You could form a small analytics function to help study questions of capability, performance and past human capital investments. Nothing beats having accurate and relevant objective data on which to base the tough decisions ahead. So, what is the best way to ensure a sustainable, highly productive and engaged workforce? A large part of the question is where should the various HR functions reside? Form should follow function. Should they all be in a central unit or spread throughout the company where they can be agile and responsive, not to mention accountable for value generation? You decide that, as CEO, you are ultimately responsible for the workforce, so you make strategic workforce planning, including succession planning, your responsibility. You give a senior HR executive that job and have him or her report directly to you. A recruiting strategy is next, and where should that reside? How about putting it under the COO - the person responsible for company operations? Next comes compensation and benefits. Should that go to the CFO, who is accountable for cash management, or do you put that in operations as well? Maybe you carve out health and welfare benefits to finance and leave pay and incentive compensation with the COO. Now, how are the people best developed? Should development be part of your central workforce function? Pieces such as leadership and engagement likely should go together, but where to put them? You have short-term problems such as engagement and long-term questions of succession. It's complicated. You can't just toss them all together like in the past. That didn't work. Who is going to keep employee records and deal with governance requirements? This is sensitive stuff and getting more so every day. What about general employee relations problems? Should they be pushed back to line management where they started 150 years ago? Isn't that what fostered the birth and growth of labor unions? Maybe you should leave the old structure in place and just give it new marching orders. But if you take a car that isn't running well and repaint it, does that make it run better? If HR was not a value-adding function when you arrived, can you afford to leave it as is while you redesign the enterprise? Just how important is workforce management in your new scheme? I'm sure you will figure it out, but one thing is certain. You have to change the fundamental concept that has driven human resources and human capital management in the past. It did not serve the company well during periods of rapid change and may have been a major reason the enterprise was foundering. After all, nothing happens unless a human being acts - all other assets of the enterprise just lay there waiting to be leveraged. It seems as though you have to give HR new consideration, because it is so important.

The Future of HR Jac Fitz-enz | Talent Management Imagine you are the incoming CEO of a struggling company. The board of directors has hired you to turn the company around as soon as possible. What are you going to do? Obviously, you have to start with big questions regarding strategy, structure, product development, sales, cash management and culture. You will probably shuffle the top management team and provide a clear vision of what and how the enterprise has to change. You need to improve cash flow pronto. You might get control of IT's massive investment by moving toward cloud computing. Eventually, you reach the human resources function. You are smart enough to know the issue is not the 1.5 percent of operating expense that goes into running HR. For the company to be successful, turnover must slow and productivity must grow. You're not an HR professional, so you aren't burdened by traditional thinking or a warm spot in your heart for those nice people who labor there. You start with an objective view of human capital management just as you did with management of cash, products, sales and information. It's probably a good idea to find out what kind of data you have on workforce productivity. Has there been any analysis at either the strategic or tactical level in the past? You could form a small analytics function to help study questions of capability, performance and past human capital investments. Nothing beats having accurate and relevant objective data on which to base the tough decisions ahead. So, what is the best way to ensure a sustainable, highly productive and engaged workforce? A large part of the question is where should the various HR functions reside? Form should follow function. Should they all be in a central unit or spread throughout the company where they can be agile and responsive, not to mention accountable for value generation? You decide that, as CEO, you are ultimately responsible for the workforce, so you make strategic workforce planning, including succession planning, your responsibility. You give a senior HR executive that job and have him or her report directly to you. A recruiting strategy is next, and where should that reside? How about putting it under the COO - the person responsible for company operations? Next comes compensation and benefits. Should that go to the CFO, who is accountable for cash management, or do you put that in operations as well? Maybe you carve out health and welfare benefits to finance and leave pay and incentive compensation with the COO. Now, how are the people best developed? Should development be part of your central workforce function? Pieces such as leadership and engagement likely should go together, but where to put them? You have short-term problems such as engagement and long-term questions of succession. It's complicated. You can't just toss them all together like in the past. That didn't work. Who is going to keep employee records and deal with governance requirements? This is sensitive stuff and getting more so every day. What about general employee relations problems? Should they be pushed back to line management where they started 150 years ago? Isn't that what fostered the birth and growth of labor unions? Maybe you should leave the old structure in place and just give it new marching orders. But if you take a car that isn't running well and repaint it, does that make it run better? If HR was not a value-adding function when you arrived, can you afford to leave it as is while you redesign the enterprise? Just how important is workforce management in your new scheme? I'm sure you will figure it out, but one thing is certain. You have to change the fundamental concept that has driven human resources and human capital management in the past. It did not serve the company well during periods of rapid change and may have been a major reason the enterprise was foundering. After all, nothing happens unless a human being acts - all other assets of the enterprise just lay there waiting to be leveraged. It seems as though you have to give HR new consideration, because it is so important.

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Worth reading…Written by one of the recruiters. Wishing you all Happy Recruiters Day! I love being a recruiter…Seriously, I think it’s the best job in the world. Yet 80% of people who enter this industry, fail in the first 2 years, leave, and are never sighted again. And it’s true, it is tough being a recruiter. And I believe in the modern era it’s getting even harder. During the downturn it got even worse. We all worked harder and harder, and earned less and less. On top of that, our customers seem to resent us more than ever, as can be seen in my recent blog, ‘God I hate recruiters’. Ironically there is a fate worse than being amongst the 80% of recruiters who fail. Yes, being an average, mediocre, ploddy recruiter who survives is real purgatory. Why? Because this job is too hard, has too many disappointments, not to be great at it. You have to be a great recruiter to reap the rewards that make it all worthwhile. So for the top 5%, the cream, recruiting is the coolest job in the world. Here’s why: Recruiting is a win/win/win. Unlike most commercial transactions, recruiting is not a win/lose scenario. If I sell you a car I aim for the highest price, you push for the lowest. One of us will feel we ‘won’, the other a bit despondent that we ‘lost’. But in the perfect recruitment scenario everybody wins. Happy client, happy candidate, happy you. This is not as trivial as it seems. There is something intensely rewarding about doing a job where everyone is grateful, everyone is excited with the outcome… and then you get paid as well. You create great outcomes Maybe the coolest thing about being a recruiter is that this is a job where you actually make good things happen. The candidate is reluctant to go on an interview, but through your influencing skills they reluctantly go along, do fantastically well, love the job, and get hired! The client won’t see your top talent because of something they spotted in the resume, but you persist, explaining the person is better than the paper, the client relents and your talent gets the job, gets promoted and in time becomes your client! For me, when I recruited, this was the real buzz. Making things happen. Controlling the process. I would crack open a beer on Friday and reflect. That would NOT have happened if I had not seen the opportunity and influenced the outcome. Beyond cool. What we do actually matters And of course that leads us to another reason why recruiting rocks. What we do actually matters. I mean it really matters. Recruiters get a horrific rap sometimes, and often it’s deserved but hey, at the end of the day, we find people jobs! And that’s a good thing right? Something to be proud of. It makes an impact. We change people’s lives. We solve companies staffing issues. We help people further their career ambitions. Fantastic! One of the beautiful things about our business is that it is so measurable. This does not suit everybody I know, but in recruiting there is nowhere to hide, and I like that. If you have the right temperament, you will thrive in this competitive environment, love the fact that you can measure yourself against your competitors and colleagues, and revel in the transparency of fee-tables and pay-by-results. Truly in our business, you eat what you kill. You can own your market. If you have longevity, if you maintain integrity, if you deliver service and outcomes that your customers want… you can elevate yourself to a true trusted advisor, and then recruitment becomes a beautiful, beautiful thing. All your work is exclusive, all your candidates come via referrals and commendations, clients treat you with respect, seek your advice, bring you into the tent . You actually ‘own’ your patch and that is a wonderful place to be! Yes it’s true. Recruiting Rocks. When it all boils down, what all of us want from a great job is just two things. Fun & Money. And if you’re a great recruiter you’ll get lots of both. The fun of winning, the fun of finding people jobs, the fun of working in a job that actually counts. And money? I don’t mean how much you earn, although of course that important. I mean working in a job where you get a great return on your efforts. That is where it is at! So if you are having a down day. Never forget. Fun and money. Recruitment rocks!

Worth reading…Written by one of the recruiters. Wishing you all Happy Recruiters Day! I love being a recruiter…Seriously, I think it’s the best job in the world. Yet 80% of people who enter this industry, fail in the first 2 years, leave, and are never sighted again. And it’s true, it is tough being a recruiter. And I believe in the modern era it’s getting even harder. During the downturn it got even worse. We all worked harder and harder, and earned less and less. On top of that, our customers seem to resent us more than ever, as can be seen in my recent blog, ‘God I hate recruiters’. Ironically there is a fate worse than being amongst the 80% of recruiters who fail. Yes, being an average, mediocre, ploddy recruiter who survives is real purgatory. Why? Because this job is too hard, has too many disappointments, not to be great at it. You have to be a great recruiter to reap the rewards that make it all worthwhile. So for the top 5%, the cream, recruiting is the coolest job in the world. Here’s why: Recruiting is a win/win/win. Unlike most commercial transactions, recruiting is not a win/lose scenario. If I sell you a car I aim for the highest price, you push for the lowest. One of us will feel we ‘won’, the other a bit despondent that we ‘lost’. But in the perfect recruitment scenario everybody wins. Happy client, happy candidate, happy you. This is not as trivial as it seems. There is something intensely rewarding about doing a job where everyone is grateful, everyone is excited with the outcome… and then you get paid as well. You create great outcomes Maybe the coolest thing about being a recruiter is that this is a job where you actually make good things happen. The candidate is reluctant to go on an interview, but through your influencing skills they reluctantly go along, do fantastically well, love the job, and get hired! The client won’t see your top talent because of something they spotted in the resume, but you persist, explaining the person is better than the paper, the client relents and your talent gets the job, gets promoted and in time becomes your client! For me, when I recruited, this was the real buzz. Making things happen. Controlling the process. I would crack open a beer on Friday and reflect. That would NOT have happened if I had not seen the opportunity and influenced the outcome. Beyond cool. What we do actually matters And of course that leads us to another reason why recruiting rocks. What we do actually matters. I mean it really matters. Recruiters get a horrific rap sometimes, and often it’s deserved but hey, at the end of the day, we find people jobs! And that’s a good thing right? Something to be proud of. It makes an impact. We change people’s lives. We solve companies staffing issues. We help people further their career ambitions. Fantastic! One of the beautiful things about our business is that it is so measurable. This does not suit everybody I know, but in recruiting there is nowhere to hide, and I like that. If you have the right temperament, you will thrive in this competitive environment, love the fact that you can measure yourself against your competitors and colleagues, and revel in the transparency of fee-tables and pay-by-results. Truly in our business, you eat what you kill. You can own your market. If you have longevity, if you maintain integrity, if you deliver service and outcomes that your customers want… you can elevate yourself to a true trusted advisor, and then recruitment becomes a beautiful, beautiful thing. All your work is exclusive, all your candidates come via referrals and commendations, clients treat you with respect, seek your advice, bring you into the tent . You actually ‘own’ your patch and that is a wonderful place to be! Yes it’s true. Recruiting Rocks. When it all boils down, what all of us want from a great job is just two things. Fun & Money. And if you’re a great recruiter you’ll get lots of both. The fun of winning, the fun of finding people jobs, the fun of working in a job that actually counts. And money? I don’t mean how much you earn, although of course that important. I mean working in a job where you get a great return on your efforts. That is where it is at! So if you are having a down day. Never forget. Fun and money. Recruitment rocks!

Worth reading…Written by one of the recruiters. Wishing you all Happy Recruiters Day! I love being a recruiter…Seriously, I think it’s the best job in the world. Yet 80% of people who enter this industry, fail in the first 2 years, leave, and are never sighted again. And it’s true, it is tough being a recruiter. And I believe in the modern era it’s getting even harder. During the downturn it got even worse. We all worked harder and harder, and earned less and less. On top of that, our customers seem to resent us more than ever, as can be seen in my recent blog, ‘God I hate recruiters’. Ironically there is a fate worse than being amongst the 80% of recruiters who fail. Yes, being an average, mediocre, ploddy recruiter who survives is real purgatory. Why? Because this job is too hard, has too many disappointments, not to be great at it. You have to be a great recruiter to reap the rewards that make it all worthwhile. So for the top 5%, the cream, recruiting is the coolest job in the world. Here’s why: Recruiting is a win/win/win. Unlike most commercial transactions, recruiting is not a win/lose scenario. If I sell you a car I aim for the highest price, you push for the lowest. One of us will feel we ‘won’, the other a bit despondent that we ‘lost’. But in the perfect recruitment scenario everybody wins. Happy client, happy candidate, happy you. This is not as trivial as it seems. There is something intensely rewarding about doing a job where everyone is grateful, everyone is excited with the outcome… and then you get paid as well. You create great outcomes Maybe the coolest thing about being a recruiter is that this is a job where you actually make good things happen. The candidate is reluctant to go on an interview, but through your influencing skills they reluctantly go along, do fantastically well, love the job, and get hired! The client won’t see your top talent because of something they spotted in the resume, but you persist, explaining the person is better than the paper, the client relents and your talent gets the job, gets promoted and in time becomes your client! For me, when I recruited, this was the real buzz. Making things happen. Controlling the process. I would crack open a beer on Friday and reflect. That would NOT have happened if I had not seen the opportunity and influenced the outcome. Beyond cool. What we do actually matters And of course that leads us to another reason why recruiting rocks. What we do actually matters. I mean it really matters. Recruiters get a horrific rap sometimes, and often it’s deserved but hey, at the end of the day, we find people jobs! And that’s a good thing right? Something to be proud of. It makes an impact. We change people’s lives. We solve companies staffing issues. We help people further their career ambitions. Fantastic! One of the beautiful things about our business is that it is so measurable. This does not suit everybody I know, but in recruiting there is nowhere to hide, and I like that. If you have the right temperament, you will thrive in this competitive environment, love the fact that you can measure yourself against your competitors and colleagues, and revel in the transparency of fee-tables and pay-by-results. Truly in our business, you eat what you kill. You can own your market. If you have longevity, if you maintain integrity, if you deliver service and outcomes that your customers want… you can elevate yourself to a true trusted advisor, and then recruitment becomes a beautiful, beautiful thing. All your work is exclusive, all your candidates come via referrals and commendations, clients treat you with respect, seek your advice, bring you into the tent . You actually ‘own’ your patch and that is a wonderful place to be! Yes it’s true. Recruiting Rocks. When it all boils down, what all of us want from a great job is just two things. Fun & Money. And if you’re a great recruiter you’ll get lots of both. The fun of winning, the fun of finding people jobs, the fun of working in a job that actually counts. And money? I don’t mean how much you earn, although of course that important. I mean working in a job where you get a great return on your efforts. That is where it is at! So if you are having a down day. Never forget. Fun and money. Recruitment rocks!

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